Indoor plants unsafe for cats



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Your favourite indoor and outdoor plants could be doing more harm than good! Here are 13 common plants to keep an eye out for. Although indoor plants do a great job at purifying the air in your home and livening up a room, if you have pets at home they could potentially do more harm than good. There are an astounding number of plants, both indoor and outdoor varieties, that are poisonous to your pets. Although some are more harmful than others, it pays to be aware and keep your home and garden pet-friendly by either keeping these toxic plants out of your home or out of reach from your beloved furry friends.

Content:
  • Indoor Plants That Are Safe for Cats
  • What Indoor Plants Are Toxic to Cats? Top 10 Plants to Avoid.
  • Your pets are perfectly safe around the indoor plants. Or are they?
  • Do I Really Need To Worry About Toxic Plants And Pets?
  • 10 non-toxic indoor plants for cats
  • 15 Non-Toxic Houseplants That Are Safe for Kids & Pets
  • 10 Non-Toxic House Plants Safe For Cats (and Dogs!)
  • Ten Household Plants That Are Dangerous/Toxic to Dogs and Cats
  • Which Plants Are Poisonous to Cats? A Complete Guide
  • 20 Common Toxic Houseplants
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Best Houseplants That Are Pet Friendly To Indoor Cats

Indoor Plants That Are Safe for Cats

One of the biggest responsibilities that pet owners face is keeping their furry friends safe from harm. When it comes to indoor and outdoor plants, there are some that are hazardous to our beloved companions, particularly cats and dogs. While many plants are perfectly safe, others can range from mildly irritating to downright lethal. Growing plants indoors is a great way to incorporate living elements into your home.

Here are some to avoid:. Grown for its attractive fronds and unfussy nature, sago palm Cycas revoluta is actually a cycad.

Despite its elegant appearance, all parts of the plant are extremely poisonous if ingested by pets, with the seeds being the most toxic part of the plant. The toxic principle is cycasin; symptoms include drooling, vomiting, bloody stools, fluid retention in the abdominal area, internal hemorrhaging, jaundice, liver failure, and death. Because of the danger and severity of symptoms, treatment should be sought immediately. Introduced as a houseplant decades ago, jade plant Crassula ovata is a succulent grown for its fleshy leaves and sturdy tree-like appearance that lends an exotic appeal.

Harmful to dogs and cats if any part of the plant is ingested, the toxic property is unknown. Symptoms, which are generally mild, include vomiting, depression, lack of coordination, lethargy, loss of appetite, and in extreme cases, a slow heart rate or convulsions.

A favorite of holiday gift givers, the oversized bulb of amaryllis Hippeastrum produces a tall, sturdy stem with large, trumpet-shaped flowers that come in a variety of colors.

Other common names include belladonna lily, St. Joseph lily, cape belladonna, and naked lady. Mildly to moderately poisonous to dogs and cats, the toxic principle, lycorine, can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypotension, excessive salivation, and tremors. The bulbs are more toxic than the leaves and flowers. Popularized for its many therapeutic uses, aloe Aloe vera is a succulent that grows natively in tropical regions worldwide.

Cultivated as a houseplant or outdoors in mild climates, Aloe vera is grown for its spiky architectural form and ease of maintenance. The gel extracted from the leaves is primarily used topically as a salve to treat burns. Taken internally, aloe is used to treat a host of other medical issues.

Aloe spp contains saponin, a toxin with foaming properties similar to soap that can harm pets if ingested. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, changes in urine color, and rarely tremors.

In most cases, toxicity is mild to moderate, but in extreme cases, ingestion can be life-threatening because of severe dehydration that can result. Weeping fig Ficus benjamina. A commonly cultivated tree native to Asia and Australia, weeping fig Ficus benjamina is grown outdoors in warmer U. Toxic to both cats and dogs if ingested, the enzyme ficin that occurs in all parts of the plant can destroy proteins in dogs that are needed to repair body tissues. The other poisonous substance, ficusin, can cause photosensitivity, irritating the skin when exposed to the sun.

Symptoms include agitation, diarrhea, drooling, loss of appetite, mouth pain, and vomiting. Skin symptoms include redness, blistering, and inflammation.

Toxicity is generally mild unless larger quantities are ingested. For generations, philodendron has been a mainstay of houseplant lovers for its wide tolerance of growing conditions, particularly low light. The most commonly grown, heartleaf philodendron Philodendron scandens is one of the easiest of all houseplants, favored for its decorative leaves and vining habit.

Also known as sweetheart plant, the leaves can be toxic to cats and dogs if chewed or ingested. The toxic ingredient of calcium oxalate crystals is released upon chewing or biting any parts of the plant. Symptoms include drooling, mouth pain and swelling, decreased appetite, vomiting, and rarely constriction of airways.

Toxicity is generally mild to moderate. Both a popular garden plant and houseplant, begonia Begonia spp. Poisonous to cats and dogs if ingested, the toxic principle is soluble calcium oxalates, which are more concentrated in the underground tubers than the leaves and stems.

The effects, which are usually mild, include vomiting, diarrhea, mouth pain, dehydration, difficulty swallowing, loss of appetite, and excessive salivation. One of the toughest and most forgiving houseplants is ZZ plant Zamioculcas zamiifolia , the name abbreviated by the nursery trade for convenience. The shiny fleshy leaves and graceful arching habit hold up well in low light and even thrive on neglect, making this a good choice for those with busy lifestyles. The toxic property of calcium oxalate is mildly to moderately toxic if ingested by pets, causing swelling of the eyes, mucous membranes, or skin.

In most cases, these and other possible symptoms of vomiting, stomach ache, and diarrhea should resolve themselves. Grown both as an indoor and outdoor plant, calla lily Zantedeschia aethiopica is best known for its elegant tubular flowers. Dangerous to pets if any parts of the plant are ingested, the active toxin is calcium oxalate crystals. Milder symptoms include a burning sensation in the mouth and throat, drooling, difficulty swallowing, and choking, which can linger up to two weeks.

In rare cases when large quantities are ingested, symptoms include vomiting, breathing difficulties, convulsions, renal failure, permanent liver or kidney damage, and even death. The level of toxicity is usually mild to moderate. A mainstay of florist shops and garden centers, kalanchoe Kalanchoe blossfeldiana is grown for its brightly colored flowers and attractive scalloped leaves.

This tropical succulent is favored by houseplant lovers for its ease of cultivation and tolerance of a wide range of conditions. All parts of the plant are poisonous to dogs and cats, with the toxic property of glycoside toxins similar to those found in foxglove. In most cases, toxicity is mild to moderate, with symptoms including drooling, vomiting, and diarrhea.

In extreme cases, effects can include lethargy, abnormal heart rate, dilated pupils, tremors, and seizures. Dumb cane Dieffenbachia. For a lush, tropical look without a lot of work, dumb cane Dieffenbachia lights up even the darkest corner of the house with its white and green variegated leaves. One of the most common houseplants, it also goes by the name leopard lily.

However attractive, the plant contains oxalate crystals and other toxic enzymes that cause a burning sensation if the leaves or stems are chewed by pets. Symptoms, which are usually mild to moderate, include drooling, vomiting, mouth pain, decreased appetite, and rarely difficulty swallowing or breathing.

Grown for its spearlike variegated leaves and upright appearance, snake plant Sansevieria trifasciata is a nearly indestructible houseplant that adds dramatic appeal to any room. Poisonous if ingested by pets, the toxic principle is saponin, which has foaming properties similar to soap. Symptoms, which are usually mild to moderate, include drooling, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

While some pets, particularly certain breeds of dogs, will eat or chew anything, others show no interest. Here are some plants to avoid:. A sure sign of spring, azaleas and rhododendrons Rhododendron spp. The beauty of this plant belies its toxicity to cats and dogs if ingested. The poisonous substance present in all parts of the plant is grayanotoxin, which can cause drooling, vomiting, and diarrhea.

In more severe cases, effects can include loss of appetite, abdominal pain, abnormal heartbeat, blindness, depression, tremors, and seizures. Toxicity can vary according to the plant variety, ranging from mildly to severely harmful. Though early bulbs are a welcome sight after a long, dreary winter, some varieties can be harmful to pets. Daffodils, hyacinths, tulips, and iris have different degrees of toxicity, with varying toxic principles and symptoms.

The highest level of toxicity is generally found in the bulbs rather than plants. Before buying any new varieties, familiarize yourself with each kind to make sure they are safe. Keep unplanted bulbs out of reach of pets and recognize possible symptoms if you suspect your pet has ingested any part of a particular plant. Learn more about daffodils , hyacinths , tulips , and iris.

Some of the most beloved summer flowers, lilies are grown from bulbs, producing dramatic tubular flowers in an endless array of colors and patterns. These beauties can be harmful to pets, depending on the variety. Calla, peach, and Peruvian lilies are less toxic, causing mild symptoms such as drooling or mouth irritation if the plant or bulb are ingested.

Others, such as Asiatic, Easter, and tiger lilies are more harmful, with the toxic property being present in all parts of the plant, but concentrated most in the bulbs. Even the pollen or water from a vase can cause poisoning, particularly for cats. Eating just one bulb can result in severe intestinal upset; symptoms include diarrhea, dehydration, drooling, vomiting, and lethargy.

In extreme cases, pets can suffer a distended abdomen, jaundice, shock, cardiac imbalance, organ failure, and death. There are several garden plants that go by the name of elephant's ear Caladium, Alocasia, Colocasia , which are grown for their large, bold leaves that can measure up to 3 feet long.

These tropicals, which were popularized during Victorian times, come in various forms and colors, lending an exotic feel to the landscape.

All are poisonous to cats and dogs, with the toxic property of calcium oxalate crystals being most concentrated in the bulbs. Symptoms include burning sensation of the mouth and throat, drooling, and vomiting. In extreme cases where larger quantities are ingested, effects can include difficulty swallowing and breathing, convulsions, organ damage, and death.

A sure sign of fall is when garden mums Chrysanthemum begin appearing in grocery stores and garden centers. These reliable perennials, which were originally cultivated hundreds of years ago in China, are grown for their long-blooming flowers that come in a rainbow of colors and forms.

All parts of the plant are poisonous to pets if ingested, with the toxic principle being pyrethrin, a natural insecticide that repels pests. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, coughing, appetite loss, agitation, and lack of coordination.

Particularly for cats, sensitivity can result in dermatitis through skin contact. A commonly used groundcover, English ivy Hedera helix is grown for its ability to cover large areas quickly and is often used to soften the look of stone walls.

Also grown as a houseplant, the overuse of this popular vine outdoors has resulted in invasiveness in some regions. Poisonous to cats and dogs if leaves or berries are eaten, there are multiple toxic principles that can make your pet sick. Symptoms include a burning sensation in the mouth and throat, drooling, excessive thirst, stomach upset, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

Skin contact with the sap can cause dermatitis. Toxicity is generally moderate, but in rare cases where larger amounts are ingested, effects can include loss of coordination, disorientation, convulsions, and coma.

Grown for its exceptionally long bloom time and cheerful bright-colored flowers, lantana provides months of continuous color during warmer weather.


What Indoor Plants Are Toxic to Cats? Top 10 Plants to Avoid.

Being a responsible pet owner means making sure there's nothing in your home that might be toxic to your beloved fur baby. That's why you want to make sure your home is filled with non-toxic houseplants that won't harm your dog or cat. Here's a look at nine non-toxic plants 1 that are safe to keep in your home, whether you have dogs or cats. African violets Saintpaulia spp are not only safe, but they also produce beautiful flowers that you will love having in your home. These are really easy to grow, which is an added bonus. Orchids of the family Orchidaceae are safe to have around dogs and cats. The spider plant Chlorophytum comosum has ribbon-like long leaves with lighter stripes.

7 Common Houseplants That Can Be Toxic to Cats and Dogs · Aloe: This common burn salve is a popular kitchen plant that's beneficial to humans.

Your pets are perfectly safe around the indoor plants. Or are they?

Too often though, pets and plants don't seem to mix. Many of our favorite plants species are poisonous to cats and dogs, as are many common plant treatments. Read on to learn about our top 10 pet-friendly houseplants and the products we formulate to keep to keep our plants, and homes, healthy without harsh chemicals. Love the low-maintenance good looks of plants in the aloe genus, but want to keep your pets safe? Haworthia is the plant for you. This stylish little succulent will look lovely in a sunny spot and only requires a little water once per week. The Boston Fern is a stalwart among houseplants, with lush fronds that grow rapidly with just a little care. Despite the delicate-looking leaves, Boston ferns are surprisingly resilient.

Do I Really Need To Worry About Toxic Plants And Pets?

One of the biggest responsibilities that pet owners face is keeping their furry friends safe from harm. When it comes to indoor and outdoor plants, there are some that are hazardous to our beloved companions, particularly cats and dogs. While many plants are perfectly safe, others can range from mildly irritating to downright lethal. Growing plants indoors is a great way to incorporate living elements into your home.

By: Lily Hannigan.

10 non-toxic indoor plants for cats

Before you swipe your card at the local nursery on that designer fiddle leaf fig, giant cactus, or cut-leaf philodendron, remember that your cat or dog will also be living with, and possibly trying to ingest, your newest plant-child. Surprisingly, some of the most popular and easily available house plants are toxic to your pets. Cats are usually the culprits when it comes to gnawing on indoor greenery. But dogs are at risk, too. Many of the same plants that can poison your cat can also poison your dog. Aloe Vera — Toxic to cats and dogs if ingested, causing vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and tremors.

15 Non-Toxic Houseplants That Are Safe for Kids & Pets

But the great news is that there are plenty of other choices when it comes to pet-friendly plants. Most pet owners would agree that plants seem to have some sort of magnetic attraction for family pets. Many cats and dogs love to nibble at plant leaves and play with their waving fronds, and some even use them as digging spots for their natural curiosity. Whether you already have a pet or plan on getting one, you can still grow a lush and healthy indoor garden. Before we start diving into the topic of which plants are safe for cats and dogs, there are a few things to take into consideration. First, take a look around your place to assess how much space you have for plants and what kind of light exposure you can provide. This will help you determine which plants best fit your home environment.

The thing is, how can you tell if your houseplant is safe or poisonous for your cat or dog? This article helps you figure out what to look out for and how.

10 Non-Toxic House Plants Safe For Cats (and Dogs!)

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Ten Household Plants That Are Dangerous/Toxic to Dogs and Cats

RELATED VIDEO: Houseplants Safe for Cats - Plant Tour

Why do they do this? The urge to dissuade kitty from targeting your plants is an understandable one. But that may not be the best approach for your cat. That brings us to toxic plants. Our houseplants come from almost all continents, lands far from early ancestors of domestic cats.

Our free microchip is only available to dog pet owners on a first come first serve basis.

Which Plants Are Poisonous to Cats? A Complete Guide

A Complete Guide. All cat parents should know the most common plants that are poisonous to cats. The toxicity of various plants and flowers can range from mild to severe, depending on the poisonous component of the plant. Plants that are poisonous to cats made up 3,, or about a third, of those calls. Wismer says.

20 Common Toxic Houseplants

Indoor plants not only add up to the aesthetic sense of the house but also feels like you are living with nature. It freshens up the air and soothes eyes as well as thoughts. But before getting them it is very important to know about the plants.



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